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A Great Place to Live


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A Great Place to Live


WHY THE NORTH WEST IS A GREAT PLACE TO LIVE

Happiness – Northern towns dominate the polls for happiness across the board, whether it’s the higher standard of living, more to do, cheaper housing or friendlier neighbours. Why wouldn’t you want to be happier?!

Money – Money makes the world go round. While you may earn slightly more in the capital, the lower house prices and a reduced cost of living make the North West a much more affordable place to live. Think cheaper houses, cheaper bills and much cheaper beers!

You’re never far from the great outdoors/arts/food/shopping/culture scene – whatever it is that takes your fancy, you’ll never be far away; and with all those extra pennies you’ll save by being in the north, you’ll be able to enjoy it too! Even in the middle of Manchester, you’re only a short journey from the beautiful peak district. If its music you’re into; the North West has several of the most vibrant music scenes and live venues so you won’t be disappointed.

You’re not the only one – the relocation of the BBC to Salford is just one of many big organisations moving their workforce ‘up north’. So if you’re a southerner starting a new northern adventure, there will be lots of other people in the same boat as you.

Friendliness – It sounds like a bit of cliché, but people really are friendlier in the north. Whether it’s just a quick hello on the train, or a bit of a laugh in the shops, you’ll always be near a friendly face. 

One of the primary motivations for my relocation to the North West was the lifestyle and cost of living which life in the North West offered me. I joined NWAS (formerly GMAS) as an Ambulance Technician in 2005. Since then I have not looked back. I am totally settled here and have made a nice life for myself. Living on the edge of the peak district has enabled me to fulfil the outdoor lifestyle that I yearned for, yet Manchester is only a stones throw away and offers all of the benefits of a modern thriving city.
— Kirsty, Advanced Paramedic, Greater Manchester

The Counties 

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Cumbria


Cumbria


Walk out of work into England’s largest national park and enjoy the freedom of England’s highest mountains on your doorstep.  Fish, play or picnic by cool, clear lakes and magical mountain tarns, and be part of a thriving Lake District community.  There are villages with inviting country pubs and towns that burst into life on market day.  If you like the great outdoors you’ll find Cumbria is a great place to live and work.

Cumbria has it all.  Tourists flock to walk and climb the fells, to explore the beautiful villages and market towns.   Windermere is the largest of the lakes and the first resort many visitors reach in the region if travelling from the South.  But it’s not just breathtaking lakes and hills - away from the lakes there are bustling centres filled with shops and brimming with life, most notably the city of Carlisle and the coastal town of Whitehaven.   Carlisle is a historic place with a unique Victorian market which is home to year round events including international food fairs.  Whitehaven is a bustling town and regularly plays host to one of the country's biggest Tall Ships events.  

Culture and inspiration are in the air in Cumbria.  Home to Beatrix Potter and birthplace of William Wordsworth, numerous artists, authors and musicians have spent time and produced their finest works in the tranquillity and beauty of the Lakes.  There are numerous opportunities to enjoy honing various skills and be creative.  

Cumbria is known for having friendly local people, willing to help fellow Cumbrians, tourists and those choosing to make the Lake District their home.  As such, Cumbria offers a range of diverse groups and clubs such as AWAS (the voice of Black and Minority Ethnic People and Communities, Outreach Cumbria (providing equality advice on Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender issues) and the Cumbria Interfaith Forum (enabling interfaith dialogue and networking in Cumbria).  All of these clubs hold weekly / monthly events for anyone to come and participate for advice or just to meet new people.  

If you are seeking to relocate to Cumbria the Trust may be able to offer you a relocation package if you take up a position in stations in West Cumbria.

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Greater Manchester


Greater Manchester


In short, Manchester is one of the most popular cities in the UK. It was also recently voted one of the best cities in the world to visit in 2016 by Lonely Planet, the only UK city to feature in the top 10 for the last two years.

Manchester is a renowned city of firsts, including the first passenger railway station, the oldest free public library, the worlds’ first program stored computer and one of the first telephone exchanges in the UK. Manchester was also the powerhouse of the Industrial Revolution. In Victorian times commerce, science and technology put Manchester on the world map.

Manchester has an impressive selection of architectural treats, owning to the rich history of the city. There are many walking tours showcasing these, some even take you underground to explore the tunnels beneath the city where you can hear the trams rumbling above your head. Manchester has many attractions, making it a wonderful place to live, work and visit; The Northern Quarter, Manchester Art Gallery, The John Ryland’s Library, The Museum of Science & Industry, The Imperial War Museum, The Lowry, The People’s History Museum, Manchester Museum, to name just a few.

Those enjoying popular sports can visit the National Football museum if Manchester City or Manchester United are not playing at home.  The city has a passion for cricket too with Lancashire County Cricket Ground easily accessible by public transport from the city centre.  Manchester Aquatics Centre was purpose built for the Commonwealth Games and one of numerous facilities in the city where would be medalists and families can enjoy the water.  If music is your passion, you can attend a concert by a world class artist performing in the Manchester Arena or the Manchester Apollo.  There are numerous live music events across the city to attend as an observer or to be on stage yourself.  There are bus and walking tours relating to Oasis and the Happy Mondays for fans to explore the city and a wide range of nightlife venues to satisfy every taste in music. 

Manchester has an impressive dining scene, with a fantastic range of bars, restaurants and cafes; for food inspired by every corner of the world. The Manchester Food & Drink Festival is now a firm calendar favourite and more events are happening year on year.  Manchester has excellent markets across the city, some of the biggest can be found in Albert Square, Piccadilly Gardens, Exchange Square and St Anne's Square throughout the year; and these expand into a magical sprawling continental style Christmas market in December.  

The Manchester bar and clubbing scene is world renowned, with an eclectic mix of watering holes to suit all tastes. The Northern Quarter has become the cornerstone of the city's night scene, with numerous trendy bars and music hang outs. When it’s time to boogie, you’re in the right place. Manchester has always had a vast range of clubs to choose from; from the northern soul mecca of the Twisted Wheel in the 60s and 70s, to the legendary Hacienda in the 80s and 90s. The Warehouse Project is among many keeping the city's clubbing legacy alive and kicking!

The diversity of the Manchester community keeps the city endlessly lively and exciting. The result is a wide range of cultural opportunities across the city, with numerous possibilities for individual engagement. For example Manchester hosted the First National Festival of LGBT History and welcomed nearly 800 visitors.  Manchester Pride welcomes thousands of people to the city every year. 

Within the wider Greater Manchester area you have the perfect mix of the buzz of the cosmopolitan aspects city, with semi-rural locations close by.  Staff who prefer the option of a quieter lifestyle and can live in close proximity to the vibrancy of Manchester by settling in the surrounding suburbs. This option is particularly popular for those with families, as the suburbs around Greater Manchester boast excellent schools, a wide range of shops and leisure facilities, with excellent transport links in and out of the city.  Cities such as Bolton and Rochdale provide easy access to walking and outdoor experiences while offering the benefit of living in a friendly and diverse city.  

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Cheshire


Cheshire


Cheshire is a county in North West England, bordering Merseyside and Greater Manchester to the north, Derbyshire to the east, Staffordshire and Shropshire to the South and Wales to the West.  Cheshire's county town is Chester and the largest town is Warrington.  The county has a population of around 1 million.  It is mostly rural, with a number of small towns and villages supporting the agricultural and other industries which produce Cheshire cheese, salt, chemicals and silk.

Quaint towns and villages can be found dotted throughout the largely unspoilt rural landscape that blossoms all year round and especially during the summer months. Meanwhile, the City of Chester provides top-class shopping, entertainment and dining opportunities.  Famous for excellent local produce, there are numerous opportunities for enjoying excellent food within Cheshire, whether in a traditional pub or choosing a fine dining experience.

Cheshire’s Peak District encompasses nearly 100 square miles of inspiring scenery that includes the world renowned Peak District National Park.  The area also includes the Gritstone Trail, a 35 mile walking route taking in wild moorland, rocky outcrops, impressive peaks and breath-taking scenery.  Delamere Forest is a popular destination which also hosts pop concerts and family events, as well as the bike trails and community groups. 

Cheshire is home to the Cheshire, Halton and Warrington Race and Equality Centre (CHAWREC). Their objectives are to eliminate discrimination, especially racial discrimination and promote equality of opportunity and good relations. CHAWREC hold events each month all over Cheshire which include events for all the family! Cheshire regularly performs well in national surveys of places to live with regards to standard of living and quality of life.  With the perfect mix of outdoor lifestyle, heritage and excellent food, it is easy to see why.   

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Merseyside


Merseyside


Liverpool is a city unlike any other.  There is a reason why such a large part of the city centre, including the famous waterfront, has UNESCO World Heritage status - the architecture is spectacular.  Alongside the ‘Three Graces’, Liverpool has a new waterfront building – a museum – to provide an account of the history of the city.  The city houses several other museums, art galleries and exhibition spaces, making it a great place to visit, live and learn.  

Liverpool is officially the World Capital of Pop, with more #1 records than any other city. Explore musical heritage in the Beatles Story or Cavern Club.  In addition the city is very proud of its nightlife, both due to the variety and quality on offer.  From superclubs to pubs with dogs, a thriving gay quarter to comedy venues on the waterfront, dance warehouses to concept bars, Liverpool at night has many faces.   The variety in entertainment may explain why so many students and visitors to the city choose to stay or return.  

If you’re into sport, the city region boasts three historic football clubs; Everton and Liverpool are two of the Premier League’s finest, while Wirral’s Tranmere Rovers play in League One.  St Helens (Saints) is the most successful rugby league club of the Super League era, and Aintree and Haydock racecourses offer top-quality racing including the world-famous Grand National Festival at Aintree each spring.  Merseyside is also home to England’s Golf Coast - 12 of the finest golf courses in Britain, including three Open Championship venues.

The diverse cultural heritage of the city and surrounding area cannot be underestimated.  Liverpool was the site of the first mosque in England back in 1889.  The city can boast both the oldest black community in the UK, as well as the oldest Chinese community in Europe.  It continues to welcome people from across the world and can now boast a Polish community of over 10000.  Liverpool Cathedral (Anglican), the largest in Britain, is truly magnificent in scale and design, whilst the Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King (Catholic), just metres away, has vast swathes of coloured glass which produces wonderful light inside the building.  As well of embracing those from different backgrounds and religions, Merseyside welcomes and supports the LGBT community, with a lively social scene and opportunity for artistic expression.  

The Merseyside area is known for enjoying the beautiful outdoors too.  There are exceptional city parks in Liverpool and a beautiful coastline, some of which is adorned with sculptures from Antony Gormley at Crosby.  Animal lovers can spend time at nearby Chester Zoo, visit Knowsley Safari park or see the squirrels at Formby.  Whatever you like, whether you are alone or with others, you can find it, enjoy it and feel at home on Merseyside.  

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Lancashire


Lancashire


Lancashire is a county in the north west of England with a population of nearly 1.5 million people.  With an important place in English history, it is a thriving, lively part of the country, with diverse communities making a pleasant place to live in contemporary Britain.  Lancashire was the birthplace of the Industrial Revolution in the 18th Century but, over 80 per cent of the county is officially classed as rural. The county is not only the main gateway to the Lake District, it also has the beautiful Yorkshire Moors and Dales on its doorstep.

It has something for everyone, from the theme parks and beaches of Blackpool and the Fylde Coast to the stunning countryside of the Ribble Valley and Lune Valley, perfect for walking and cycling.  It is home to unique and wildlife rich Morecambe Bay in the north and the flat and fertile coastal plains around Ormskirk and the Ribble Estuary.  It also offers undulating fells and moorland of the Forest of Bowland and Pennines in the east. Lancashire includes many famous towns and cities such as Accrington, Blackburn, Burnley, Blackpool, Chorley, Clitheroe, Lancaster and Preston. The historic city of Lancaster offers a wide range of great places to eat, entertainment, theatres and local museums. Lancashire is also is home to famous Pendle Hill, (which is only 165ft shy of being a mountain) the trial of the Pendle Witches in Lancaster in 1612 is the UK’s most famous witch hunt. 

In March 2014, Lancashire towns Clitheroe and Ramsbottom featured in the Sunday Times ‘Best Places to Live top 10’, which takes into account transport links, quality of schools and natural beauty.  The towns were also graded on their low crime rates, property prices, cultural life and unemployment figures. 

There are numerous opportunities to play and observe sports across the region.  Preston North End has been home to numerous celebrated footballers and managers, with other teams including Burnley , Blackburn Rovers and Blackpool.  Cricket, swimming and running are easy to access.  You are welcome to train for a triathalon while you are here too.  

Lancashire also offers a number of community groups with something for everyone, including Feeling safe in your community, Church and Faith Groups, LGBT projects and Ethnic community groups and events.  Lancashire is the birthplace of many delicious foods such as the Lancashire Hotpot, black pudding, Lancashire Cheese, Eccles and Chorley cakes, and also the very first fish and chip shop. There are also lots of incredible restaurants and breweries dotted around the county.

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